How to make extra money online – Stuff.co.nz

”Side hustle” – it’s a term as intrinsically linked with Millenials as “smashed avo”.

But with Kiwis from all generations feeling the financial pinch due to Covid-19, earning a second income on the side is rapidly becoming the norm.

A recent survey found 1.2 million Kiwis are aready making money from a side hustle and another million are considering it.

So, what are the options?

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Have an online garage sale

According to Trade Me, the average Kiwi has at least 18 unwanted items around the house.

That’s about 90 million secondhand items around the country and, based on the average selling price of items on Trade Me, about $1500 each of us could pocket after clearing out the cupboards.

According to Trade Me, the average Kiwi has about $1500 worth of unwanted items around the house.

123rf

According to Trade Me, the average Kiwi has about $1500 worth of unwanted items around the house.

It might pay – literally – to have a closer look at your garden, too. This variegated monstera recently went for a record $6551 on Trade Me, about the same price as a 2006 Lexus.

A word of warning before you embark on a listing frenzy: Make sure you play by the Tax Man’s rules to avoid any headaches later.

According to the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment, the occasional online deal is fine – there are no tax implications for private one-off sales.

However, if you make money from regularly selling things online, you’re probably in business and your tax obligations are the same as if you were selling goods in a shop.

Make something new

The run on homemade face masks may be over but there is still plenty of demand for locally produced and handmade products.

That’s unlikely to change while border restrictions cause headaches and backlogs at ports all over the planet so why not strike while the iron is hot and the imports are slow?

Face masks were big business at the height of lockdown.

LAWRENCE SMITH/Stuff

Face masks were big business at the height of lockdown.

If you’re not comfortable launching your own site or just want to test the waters, there are plenty of established online platforms for selling your goods – Trade Me, Facebook, Etsy and Felt are all a good start.

Choosing what to make is likely to be your toughest decision. If you’re short of ideas, have a dig around any of those online marketplaces – when something grabs you, have a think about how it could be improved or modified to appeal to a different market.

Or, if you happen to have one of those multi-hued monsteras on your hands, you could consider propogating it.

Plants are clearly much bigger business than many of us would have expected and even cuttings are snapped up on Facebook.

Plants are big business, with this variegated monstera going for more than $6000 on Trade Me.

TRADE ME

Plants are big business, with this variegated monstera going for more than $6000 on Trade Me.

Get cash for creativity

Don’t want to peddle your physical wares? How about your words or music?

Patreon connects creatives of all kinds – artists, musicians, writers, podcasters, gaming creators – with their fans and helps them earn a stable income at the same time.

In exchange for a membership fee, charged monthly or per completed work, “patrons” get perks like premium content, early access to new work and a direct link to their favourite creatives.

Everybody wins.

Share your space

Those with a spare room, or spare property, to let out could make some serious money, particularly over the holiday season.

While upmarket accommodation will bring in the biggest bucks, not every traveller wants five-star luxury.

iSTOCK

While upmarket accommodation will bring in the biggest bucks, not every traveller wants five-star luxury.

With border restrictions keeping us all in Aotearoa this summer, many traditional accommodation options are already booked solid and last-minute holiday makers are scrambling for a place to rest their heads.

While upmarket accommodation will obviously bring in the biggest bucks, don’t be downhearted if your home is more humble – not every traveller has the cash to splash on five-star digs and what you’re able to offer may be exactly what someone else is after.

YouTube

After becoming a cyber sensation almost overnight, Aucklander Liam Thompson shelved alternative employment plans and became a full-time YouTuber.

A clip of his dog, Max, playing popular open world game Minecraft went viral, boosting Thompson’s online profile to the point where he was able to start playing ads on his video.

YouTuber Liam Thompson recently bought himself a Tesla.

Ryan Anderson/Stuff

YouTuber Liam Thompson recently bought himself a Tesla.

He collects about 40 per cent of the ad revenue, with monthly deposits made into his bank account, and recently bought himself a Tesla.

While successes like Thompson’s are the exception rather than the rule and most of us would need to drastically lower our expectations – I’d be aiming for a 90s Toyota at best – it’s worth a shot.

Weirder things have happened this year, right?

This article was commissioned in response to a commercial partnership with Vocus. We have produced it independently, to the same standards applied to the rest of our journalism. Read more about our partnership content here.

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